PJ/CRO Indoc

Course Description:

Trains and selects qualified airmen for the PJ Pararescue specialty. Students are put through a rigorous physical and mentally stressful training program that prepares them for all pipeline courses and their final AFSC-awarding course. Includes run, swim, underwater confidence, calisthenics, lifetime fitness principles, circuit training, motivation week, rucksack marches, field drills IAW FM 21-20, 35′ rope climb, medical terminology, metric manipulation, nutrition and nutrition performance, dive physics, dive terminology/tables, M-16 and M-9 weapons qualification, and aerospace physiological training. Upon graduation, students attend the following prerequisite pipeline courses before attending their AFSC-awarding school: US Army Combat Divers Qualification, US Army Airborne Parachutist, US Army Military Freefall Parachutist, US Army Joint Special Operations Medical Course, US Air Force Combat Survival, and US Air Force Underwater Egress Training.

POVs not authorized for use at, to, or from the indoctrination course. Report in uniform with full military complement. Retrainee personnel must have current Class III flying physical with AETC Surgeon General approval indicating that member is qualified to perform SCUBA and Freefall duties IAW Army directives. ARC personnel must in- and out-process through the Lackland AFB ARC liaison office before training. Pipeline prerequisite training for ARC and retrainee students will be scheduled by 342 TRS/CTF with instructions for orders publication sent to the appropriate units/MPFs.

Prerequisites:

All candidates (NPS/GTEPS, retrainees, ARC, AF prior service, and sister service prior service) must successfully complete the appropriate Physical Ability and Stamina Test (PAST). Member must be a US citizen, be able to obtain a Secret clearance, volunteer for hazardous duty (e.g., military combat diver (SCUBA), military parachuting), score a minimum of 43 on the general category of the ASVAB test (sister service equivalent), must pass flying Class III physical with eye restriction as prescribed for parachutist/marine diving duty. All physicals MUST be reviewed and stamped by HQ AETC/SGPS (US Army will only recognize the AETC/SG stamp). The PAST criteria must be administered and the candidate must pass the test prior to attending the Pararescue Indoctrination Course. For Non-Prior Service candidates test will administered during Basic Military Training (BMT), GTEP candidates will be tested prior to attending BMT and during BMT, Prior Service will be tested at the Recruiting Station, Guard, Reserve, and Retrainees will report 1 duty day prior to class start date in order to be administered the PAST.

The purpose of this course is to recruit, screen, and train candidates for Pararescue duty. Training mentally and physically prepares students to deal with the rigors of the training pipeline, and their ultimate assignment. To prepare a student mentally, we will provide physical situations and stresses that test your determination and perseverance. This is done because Pararescuemen may find themselves in mentally demanding situations,where the lives of many depend on our abilities to function despite fatigue or injury. Indoctrination course training will emphasize unity and the strength of teamwork. Some candidates will feel our expectations are too high and will quit. If you do graduate, it should prevent you from failure in the pipeline, if 100% dedication is maintained. Before reporting to the I-Course, prepare yourself physically and mentally and consider the following information:

All students, regardless of rank will:

  1. Be housed in the I-course dormitory
  2. Abide by curfew,phase programs, and liberty restrictions
  3. Not drive a private motor vehicle or travel between pipeline schools in a POV
  4. Not consume alcohol during the I-course
  5. Not consume tobacco products during the I-course
  6. Eat all mandatory meals in the designated dining hall
  7. Take part in all school requirements, traditions, and activities
  8. Maintain exemplary standards of appearance and discipline
  9. Maintain living areas in accordance with selection course standards
  10. Perform Charge of Quarters. All students must train to their capacity. Objective evaluations as well as subjective feedback from instructors will be used to gauge student progression and motivation.Students are expected to attain 80% or higher on all academic tests. Failinga retest will result in elimination from this course.Senior ranking students will function as class leaders. They will be responsible and accountable for all students during training and will be the main focal point for cadre/student interaction.

 

Q & A with Indoc Graduates
Worst moment during the Indoctrination course?
– The key to this course is not to quit, it was always disheartening when a member of our team gave up on himself.
– Losing team members. Realizing your own weakness.
– Motivation night during the pool session.
– Waking up at 0430 every morning.
Best moment during the Indoctrination Course?
– Finishing Motivation Night was the best feeling ever.
– Passing the final eval with the rest of the team.
– Completing the six mile eval run.
– Accomplishing your personal weakness. Everyone has one and one day you just get it and your and your confidence in your abilities grows.
What did you learn, if anything, about your self?
– Persistence and determination are excellent characteristics to make it through tough times.
– That I can tolerate pain while still perform to the standards, and that when things don’t seem fair I can drive on and accomplish the task at hand.
– Anything is possible if you want it bad enough.
– To push myself past what I thought possible.
What did you think about the Indoctrination Course?
– A awesome course that provided the hardest challenge of my life.
– It was very challenging and rewarding.
– It’s a long hard road that has prepared us for the rest of our career. It was worth every minute.
– It was the most difficult challenge both mentally and physically that any of us have ever been through.
What can you suggest to perpare oneself for the course?
– Try to research the requirments and standards and meet those standards before coming. Be very profecient at treading water before coming. (ie. beater style)
What was the hardest part of the course?
– The hardest part was definitelty the water confidence, However, psychologically the hardest part was waking up every morning and saying I will never quit! the instructors make you think about that everyday. Staying focoused on the ultimate goal is a must.
What was the easiest part of the course?
– The easiest part was falling asleep at the end of the day.
What did you build from day one to now?
– We built a brotherhood in which trust and teamwork is essential. The seven of us have such a cohesive bond with one another that nothing can come between us. Not only did we build mental stregnth and physical endurance we built an experience that will last a lifetime. Good Luck!


INDOCTRINATION COURSE PHYSICAL TRAINING.

Physical training at the Indoctrination Course is very progressive. However, the standards are reasonable and attainable if a student applies himself. Scroll down to see the physical evaluations that will be conducted during training.

Run training.
A variety of different runs will be conducted during training at this course. These runs include long-slow-distance, fartlek, Indian sprints, interval training, and others. The type running you will be evaluated on is “all out” distance running. Our standard for evaluated runs is a 7 to 7:10 minute pace depending on the distance.

Calisthenics.
Our calisthenics program is structured to allow maximum variety and flexibility in each session however; instructors are free to choose any exercise. Because of the infinite variety of calisthenics, only the evaluated exercises are described. Calisthenics training is accomplished two to three times per week.

Weight training.
Weight training is accomplished twice a week during training and is done utilizing the “circuit training” technique. You rotate from one station to the next accomplishing one to two sets at 8-12 repetitions each. This maximizes strength and endurance.

Water confidence and swim training.
Look below to see the exercise descriptions for the swim training and water confidence that will be conducted during training.

NOTE: For further information or questions concerning Pararescue and Combat Control training contact:

342 TRS/CTFI
Pararescue Indoctrination Course
1170 Medina Base Road
Lackland AFB, TX 78236-5506
DSN 473-2246/2247 (Fax: 473-3475)
Commercial (210) 671-2246/2247 or 1-800-438-2696

PHYSICAL AND WATER CONFIDENCE EVALUATIONS:

The Indoctrination Course is broken down into two distinct phases. Phase I is primarily a selection phase. It is also a training phase where you will learn the basic fundamentals to successfully complete the tasks required. Your success depends on your determination. For those who make it to phase II, this is primarily a training phase. You will hone those skills learned in Phase I and complete your progression through a series of evaluations that test physical and academic abilities. The entire ten weeks will include 9 evaluations which require completion of calisthenics, water confidence, running, and swimming events in the allotted time. A rucksack march and team run will be completed prior to graduation. Few people ever experience the feeling of accomplishment you will feel when you graduate.

PHASE 1.

Selection is made up of two factors: your ability to pass the evaluations given in this phase, and without question, your own self-selection by continuing training. The majority of those who select themselves out do so in the first week of training. They lose the focus of why they are here, having difficulty seeing past training elements that exist in this phase, and lose sight of their long-term goals. Phase I is made up of three skills demonstration areas as depicted in Figure 1. It is the most difficult and intense phase in the program. Motivation week is your gut check. By that we mean, do you really want to be here and eventually wear the beret of a Pararescueman. If you do, you will graduate motivation week and move on to Phase II. You will be challenged to the limit on your ability to overcome physical as well as mental stresses during a non-standard training day. The words “Never Quit” have not had as much meaning up to this point as they will during this week. Throughout the week, you will be given the opportunity to function as a team. You will learn how even the simplest team tasks can be adversely affected by high physical and mental stress when you have moved out of your comfort zone. More important, you will learn, hopefully, how to overcome such adversity. Do not think for a minute that you are tough enough to get through this alone. Rely on your team and never quit!

PHASE II.

Having successfully completed Phase I, the selection phase of your training, you will then move on to Phase II, a training phase. This phase is made up of areas where physical skills continue to improve and your academic abilities move from basically knowledge-only to application of that knowledge. Figure 2 provides an overview of Phase II. Many of the skills you learn and hone here will be applied in the Pipeline.

The following criteria is used for weekly evaluations:

  1. Successfully complete the minimum calisthenics repetitions in the allotted time
  2. You will be evaluated on pull-ups, sit-ups, and push-ups
  3. Each calisthenicis evaluated separately. Repetitions will be counted by an instructor…only repetitions completed in proper form will be counted
  4. Failure of the same calisthenics exercise, in two consecutive evals is grounds for elimination for the class
  5. Successfully complete the required distance run in the allotted time
  6. Failure of 2consecutive run evals is ground for elimination from the class
  7. To successfully pass a weekly water confidence evaluation a student must:
  8. Successfully complete the minimum time or distance requirements for bobbing, drown proofing, lifesaving, mask and snorkel recovery, buddy breathing, underwater knots,weight belt swim, treading water, and ditching and donning
  9. Failure of thesame water confidence exercise in 2 consecutive evals is grounds for elimination from the class

Missing an evaluation due to medical waiver, sick call, or any other reason is an AUTOMATIC FAILUREof all areas missed.

If a student fails to achieve the minimum standard for any event during an evaluation he will still complete the remainder of the eval with his class.

PHYSICAL TRAINING
CALISTHENICS

  • PUSHUPS
  • SITUPS
  • CHINUPS/PULLUPS
  • FLUTTER KICKS

AEROBIC

RUNNING

  • LONG SLOW DISTANCE
  • TIMED EVALUATION
  • INTERVAL

SWIMMING

  • 1000 METER
  • ROCKET FIN SWIM
  • ABU INTRO
  • SIDESTROKE
  • UDT UNDERWATER

WATER CONFIDENCE

  • UNDERWATERS
  • 15 METER MASK/SNORKEL RECOVERY
  • BUDDY BREATHING
  • TREADING WATER
  • EQUIPMENT RECOVERY
  • WEIGHT BELT SWIM
  • DROWNPROOFING

ACADEMICS
MEDICAL

  • ANATOMY
  • MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
  • NUTRITION
  • HYDRATION

ACQUATICS

  • DIVE METRICS
  • DIVE TERMINOLOGY
  • DIVE PHYSICS
  • DIVE TABLES

MOTIVATION WEEK
SLEEP DEPRIVATION

  • EARLY TO RISE
  • LATE TO REST

COMFORT ZONE STRESS

  • RUNNING
  • CALISTHENICS
  • WATER CONFIDENCE
  • INSPECTIONS
    • ABU’s
    • BLUES
    • BARRACKS
  • EQUIPMENT CARRY
    • ZODIAC BOAT
    • TELEPHONE POLE
    • “THE RAIL”
  • RUCKSACK MARCH

TEAM WORK SKILLS

  • LEADERSHIP REACTION COURSE
  • FLICKERBALL
  • TEAM ACADEMICS
  • SELFPACED LONG SLOW DISTANCE RUNS
  • OBSTACLE COURSE

PHASE II
(Weeks 4-10)

Having successfully completed Phase I, the selction phase of your training, you will then move on to Phase II, a training phase. Phase II is made up of Equipment ConditioningPhysical TrainingTeamwork SkillsAcademics, and Inspections. In this phase, physical skills continue to improve and your academic abilities move from basically knowledge-only to application of that knowledge. Many of the skills you learn and hone here will be applied in the Pipeline

EQUIPMENT CONDITIONING

  • EQUIPMENT CARRY
    • ZODIAC BOAT
    • TELEPHONE POLE
    • “THE RAIL”
  • RUCK MARCH

PHYSICAL TRAINING
CALISTHENICS

  • PUSHUPS
  • SITUPS
  • CHINUPS/PULLUPS
  • FLUTTER KICKS

AEROBIC

RUNNING

  • LONG SLOW DISTANCE
  • TIMED EVALUATION
  • INTERVAL

SWIMMING

  • 1000 METER
  • ROCKET FIN SWIM
  • ABU DISTANCE SWIMS
  • SIDESTROKE
  • UDT UNDERWATER

WATER CONFIDENCE

  • UNDERWATERS
  • 25 METER MASK/SNORKEL RECOVERY
  • BUDDY BREATHING
  • TREADING WATER
  • EQUIPMENT RECOVERY
  • WEIGHT BELT SWIM
  • DROWNPROOFING

TEAMWORK SKILLS

  • LEADERSHIP REACTION COURSE
  • TEAM ACADEMICS
  • OBSTACLE COURSE
  • PROBLEM SOLVING EXCERSISES
  • ORIENTEERING

ACADEMICS
MEDICAL

  • ANATOMY
  • MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

ACQUATICS

  • DIVE METRICS
  • DIVE TERMINOLOGY
  • DIVE PHYSICS
  • DIVE TABLES

INSPECTIONS

  • UNIFORMS
  • EQUIPMENT
  • BARRACKS

EVALUATION CRITERIA (Updated 2017)

RUN FIN SWIM PULL
UPS
SIT
UPS
PUSH
UPS
Week 2 2 miles 14:00 1000m 20 min

8

50 50
Week 3 3 miles 21:30 1000m 20 min

8

55 50
Week 4 3 miles 21:00 1500m 30 min

9

55 55
Week 5 4 miles 28:36 1500m 30 min

9

60 55
Week 6 4 miles 28:00 2000m 40 min

10

65 60
Week 7 5 miles 35:30 2000m 40 min

11

70 60
Week 8 5 miles 35:00 2500m 50 min

12

70 65
Week 9 6 miles 44:06 3000m 60 min

13

75 70

 

Underwater swimming is an important skill for gaining confidence in the underwater environment. The water confidence tasks you will do at this school will require you to swim distances underwater. The more efficient you become at underwater swimming, the more confident and capable you will become in completing our evaluated tasks — and the SCUBA demands of our specialty. Underwater swimming is basically a modification of the breast stroke. The only difference is the arm pull continues farther to the rear to provide thrust.

  • Equipment – A dive mask will be worn.
  • Procedure – The exercise begins with the students lined up at one end of the pool. The instructor will initiate the start of the exercise. On the command “Go”, the students will swim underwater from one end of the pool to the other (25 meters) without surfacing. Upon touching the opposite wall, they will swim a freestyle sprint back to the starting point. Upon return, they will be allowed to rest the remainder of the specified time period. The exercise is repeated on the command “Go” until the student has completed the required number of underwaters. To satisfactorily complete this exercise the student must leave the wall immediately on the command and remain underwater until reaching the opposite wall. He must also sprint as quickly as possible back to the starting point. A student will be given one warning for unsatisfactory performance and on the next occurrence will be scored unsatisfactory for the exercise.

Fin Swimming

All evaluated swims at the Indoctrination Course are distance swims using “Rocket” style fins. The swimmer is in the prone glide position with one arm locked out in front of him, to act as a guide arm. The other arm is trailing, or can be used — in a side stroke fashion — to provide propulsion (UDT recovery stroke). The legs are locked at the knees with the movement coming from the hips. The legs are used in flutter kick motion to provide propulsion. Breathing is similar to freestyle swimming, but is on one side only. The swimmers body is oriented to the side, but never on the back.

  • Equipment – A dive mask, “Rocket” fins, and wet-suit boots.
  • Procedure – The exercise will begin with the students prepared to go and in a swimming lane. On the command “Go”, the students will leave the wall and begin to swim, using only their legs, in a flutter kick manner to propel them through the water. Students will swim on their sides or stomach only, with one arm extended, looking down that arm and ahead while swimming. Upon reaching the wall, the student will turn around and continue to swim. This will continue until the required number of laps have been completed, or the instructor calls time. During fin swims no freestyle strokes or dolphin kicks will be used. If sprints are being conducted the instructor will specify a distance and maximum time to meet. Students will complete the sprint distance as quickly as possible and be allowed a rest period before the next sprint. To successfully complete swimming exercises you must complete each swim in the prescribed manner and within the time period prescribed. If you continually utilize improper technique, fail to complete a distance swim in the time allocated, or continuously fail to perform sprints within the maximum time, you will be scored as unsatisfactory for the exercise.
The intent of the following training items is to increase your confidence in the water, increase the amount of time you can spend underwater, and increase your ability to react calmly and rationally in high-stress situations. The following pool training events will be evaluated during your training at the Indoctrination course.
The following water confidence exercise descriptions are included for your information only! Do not attempt to do these exercises unless you have a lifeguard standing by for safety. Doing these events may lead to “shallow water blackout”. If this condition occurs a lifeguard must be immediately available to prevent brain damage or death.

Mask & Snorkel Recovery

  • Equipment – Mask and snorkel.
  • Procedure – The exercise begins with all students at one end of the pool. The instructor will throw or place the students mask and snorkel a specified distance from the student. This exercise is accomplished one or two students at a time. On the command “Go”, the student will leave the surface of the pool and swim underwater to the location of his mask and snorkel. Upon reaching them, he will place the snorkel between his legs and position his mask on his face. Once positioned, he will clear the mask of water, retaining a small amount of air. He will then make a controlled ascent to the surface with the snorkel in his mouth and left arm extended above his head with clenched fist. Once on the surface he will clear the snorkel and give the “OK” hand signal to the evaluating instructor. He will ensure he is facing the instructor and immediately demonstrate that his mask and snorkel are clear by looking up at the instructor and breathing through the snorkel. A small amount of water in the mask is permissible as long as it does not exceed the top of the nose indents. While on the surface, the student will not break the mask or snorkel seal until the exercise has been graded and he is permitted to do so by the instructor. This exercise will be scored unsatisfactory if the student surfaces prior to clearing the mask or fails to satisfactorily perform in any of the above listed areas.
    Mask
     – Clearing the water from a flooded mask involves replacing the water with expelled air. The air, being lighter than water, will force the water out of the lower portion of the mask, if the upper portion is held to the face by light hand pressure to prevent the escape of air. The amount of hand pressure and the position of the hand will vary, depending on the mask, and personal technique.
    Snorkel 
    – To clear water from a flooded snorkel while on the surface, exhale or puff through the snorkel. The column of air will displace the water to expel it from the snorkel. You may also tilt your head back when on the surface and gravity will clear the snorkel for you.

Buddy Breathing/Pool Harassment

  • Equipment – Face masks, one snorkel per two-man buddy team.
  • Procedure – This exercise is conducted in the deep end of the pool. Students will enter the water when directed by the instructor. On the command “Start”, they will place their faces into the water and begin to survival float while buddy breathing from one snorkel. During the exercise period, the students will maintain control of each other with one hand. With the other hand they will maintain control and pass the snorkel between each other. A student should try to consider his buddy’s limited air supply and take only one breath before passing the snorkel back. During this exercise the students will breath only through the snorkel. At no time will they remove their heads from the water and breath from the surface. The exercise period ends on the command “Time”. To satisfactorily complete this exercise, each student must keep his face in the water during the entire exercise period. He must remain calm, maintain control of himself, his buddy, and the snorkel. The student will be given one warning for unsatisfactory performance and on the next occurrence will be scored unsatisfactory for the exercise. Pool harassment is added as a more intense form of buddy breathing. It involves the instructor entering the water and providing the students with certain stressful situations to see if a student will panic. The same standards apply to this exercise. During pool harassment the instructor may try to:

Take the snorkel (don’t let him)
Remove the face mask
Attempt to separate partners (don’t let him)
Cut off your air supply for one or two breaths
Splash water
Push students underwater
Other maneuvers at his discretion

Drownproofing

  • Equipment – Mask, ropes or Velcro hand/leg cuffs
  • Procedure – Drown proofing is accomplished in four tasks. Students will be divided into pairs with one student acting as a safety swimmer. The exercise begins with the student’s hands and feet bound and the student sitting on the deck at the deep end of the pool. Upon the command “Enter the water”, the student will enter the water and start to bob.
    • The first task is bobbing. Bobbing is accomplished by sinking to the bottom of the pool. Upon reaching the bottom, bend your knees and push off the bottom, exhaling until you reach the surface. When your head reaches the surface, inhale and begin the process again.
    • The second task is floating. Floating is accomplished by inhaling as much air as possible into your lungs. The student will then tuck his chin into his chest, bend forward at the waist and relax, staying within a 4×4 meter square. When air is required, you will bring your head out of the water, breathe then go back to the float position. Students will not touch the bottom or sides of the pool and are required to stay in the square.
    • The third task is the traveling. The student will dolphin kick 100 meters without touching the bottom or sides of the pool. The dolphin kick is accomplished on your stomach, body bent at the waist and your head moving up and down in the water. Your feet and knees will propel you through the pool.
    • The fourth task consists of flips and mask recovery. Once the travel is complete the student will begin bobbing again. Within five bobs you will accomplish a front flip underwater. Within another five bobs you will accomplish a backwards flip underwater. Once both flips are complete, a mask is thrown to the bottom of the pool. The student will go to the bottom, pick up the mask with his teeth, and complete five bobs. After all tasks are complete, the instructor will call “Time”. The safety will assist the bobber out of the water. To successfully complete this exercise the student must accomplish all of the above tasks in sequence and without panicking. If unable, he will be scored unsatisfactory for the exercise.

Lifesaving

  • Equipment – None.
  • Procedure – Lifesaving is accomplished with one student acting as a victim and another student performing the rescue. Students will be evaluated on two water entries, two basic lifesaving rescues (approaches) and three releases (when the victim grabs the rescuer, the rescuer must free himself from the victim in order to save the victim) in accordance with the American Red Cross Lifesaving Handbook.
    • The two water entries you will accomplish are the long shallow dive and the stride jump. The long shallow dive is used when the water is known to be clear of obstructions and a fast entry for rescue where speed in reaching the victim is essential. Your entry should be flat and long, arms and legs are extended straight forward and aft streamlining the body. After the dive you quickly raise your head and approach the victim. The stride jump is used with questionable bottom conditions, unknown depths, and when visual contact with the victim is required. Your entry begins by leaning forward at the waist and jumping into the water. Your arms are held at shoulder height, horizontal to the water and prepared to press down and forward as your body enters the water. Upon entering the water, snap your legs together in a scissor fashion while bringing the arms down and forward. This will stop your forward motion. You must keep your head above the water and your eyes on the victim.
    • The two approaches you will accomplish are the front surface approach to an inactive victim and an underwater approach to an active victim.
      • The front surface approach is accomplished by grabbing the victim’s right or left hand (whichever is easier). Vigorously pull the victim’s hand up and towards you. Once the victim is leveled off, place your other arm over their shoulder and around their chest.
      • The underwater approach begins with the rescuer diving to a level below that of the victim’s knees. You will come in on the victim’s knees keeping your eyes at knee level. Turn the victim 180º by placing one hand in front of one knee and the other hand behind the other knee. Turn the victim, maintaining contact while working your way up the victim’s back.
    • A release is required when the rescuer is held by the victim. You will perform three types of releases. The first is the double grip on one wrist release. The second is the front head hold release and the third is the rear head hold release.
      • To accomplish the double grip release, the victim will grab either hand of the rescuer. The rescuer uses his free hand to reach down and grab the opposite hand of the victim attempting to shake the victim loose (two shakes). This will normally break the victim’s grip. The rescuer will then place his foot into the victim shoulder and push them away. You will use the same side foot as the hand that you used to shake free (if your left hand was the one that shook, use your left foot into the victim’s right shoulder).
      • The front head hold release is needed when the victim “bear hugs” the rescuer around the head. When this occurs you will attempt to get a breath of air, then duck your chin underwater (suck, tuck, and duck). Once underwater grab the victim at the hips and push until your arms are straight. At the same time, pull and slide your head down the victim’s chest. When your head is free turn the victim at the hips then move your hands up to the victim’s armpits and boost him to the surface by kicking vigorously.
      • The rear head hold release is needed when the victim “bear hugs” the rescuer from the rear. When this occurs you will attempt to get a breath of air, then duck your chin away into the victim’s lower hand. You will run your hands up your side until they contact the victim’s lower hand and elbow. Turn the victim’s lower hand so that his palm faces out. At this time, push the victim’s lower hand out and pry up on the lower elbow. Immediately begin to duck under the victim’s arm, maintaining control of the victim’s lower arm as you sink down. Attempt to move to the victim’s backside, bringing his lower arm with you. You will now have the victim in an arm-lock and you have control.

Bobbing

  • Equipment – Fins, wet-suit boots, T-shirt, Mask, tanks, and weight belt.
  • Procedure – This exercise begins with the students in the shallow end of the pool. The first step is to don the required equipment. Before entering the water, each student will visually check the water and then call out “Entering the water“. The student will then, while in the sitting position, lean out over the water and by pivoting on one hand roll into the water. This procedure will prevent banging the tanks on the edge of the pool or other students. It also prevents possible damage to both tanks and the pool. Upon entering the water, the students will check their equipment. The students will then form a line facing the deep end of the pool and ensure they have enough separation between each other to prevent interference. The instructor will start the exercise with the command “Bob on Down“. At that time, the students will turn around and begin to bob backwards from the shallow end, toward the deep end of the pool. Bobbing is accomplished by relaxing when on the bottom, getting into a squatting position, arms outstretched above your head, with hands clasped together in a streamlined configuration, and face looking toward the surface. When you feel the need for air push off vigorously from the bottom. When you feel your ascent slowing down, forcefully bring your arms down and propel yourself to the surface. It is very important that during this ascent you expel all of the air in your lungs. The weight of the equipment will not allow you to get more than one breath on the surface. Attempting to get additional breaths will only cause fatigue and panic. When the students have reached the deepest part of the pool, they will turn around so they are facing the instructor standing on the surface at the deep end of the pool. Once all students are in the deepest part of the pool the instructor will command “Switch“. The student will then remove the fins from his feet and place them on his hands. This is done by placing your arms through the fin straps and grasping the tips of the fins. After all students have switched, the exercise time begins. During the exercise the period the student must remain in the deepest part of the pool. After the required time is completed, the instructor will call “Time“. At this command, the students will bob backwards to the starting point, and other students will assist them in getting out of their gear. To successfully complete this exercise the student must accomplish all of the above tasks in the prescribed manner and without panicking. If unable, he will be scored unsatisfactory for the exercise.

Underwater Knots

These knots will be taught prior to the exercise: bowline, square knot, and girth hitch.

  • Equipment – 2 sling ropes per student
  • Procedure – The pool will be prepared for this exercise on instructor command. A long pool rope and the associated weights will be used in rigging the pool for training (the class leader will ensure these are at the pool). The rope will be strung across the deepest end of the pool, with the 25lb weights on the sides, holding the rope to the bottom. The exercise begins with the students spread out over the length of the rope treading water. Each student will have two ropes (one in hand and one stowed in the swimming trunks). The instructor will then announce the know or knots to be tied on the dive. On command, each student will descend to the rope and tie the required knot(s) prior to surfacing. All knots will be dressed and the tails will not be less than 4 inches, nor greater than 8 inches. After the knot(s) have been tied an instructor will check them to ensure they are tied correctly. If tied incorrectly the exercise will be repeated until the student is able to complete the required knot(s). If he is unable to satisfactorily tie the knot(s) he will be scored as unsatisfactory for the exercise.

Equipment Recovery

  • Equipment – Mask, fins, wet-suit boots, and weight belt.
  • Procedure – The exercise begins with all equipment on and the students in the shallow end of the pool, lined facing the deep end of the pool. On the command “Move to the deep end”, the students will begin treading water and moving to the deep end of the pool. Once at the deep end, the students will tread water for a specified time period. On the command “Ditch your equipment”, the students will make a clear water surface dive to the deepest part of the pool. They will then ditch their gear in the following sequence: fins together and pointed to the head of the pool, mask on top of the fins, weight belt neatly placed over the mask and fins. After ditching, each student will make a controlled ascent to the pool surface with left arm over his head with clenched fist, and give the “OK” sign to an instructor. On the command “Recover your equipment”, students will make a clear water surface dive to their equipment, and don it in the following sequence: weight belt first, fins second, mask third. Each student will then clear their mask and make a controlled ascent to the surface with clenched fist above the head. On the surface, they will give the “OK” signal to an instructor and move to the head of the pool with their head out of the water and mask clear. Students will not touch any equipment on the way to the head of the pool. At the pool head, the students will exit the water and sit on the pool edge with their hands on top of their heads. Their equipment will then be checked for proper configuration by an instructor. To satisfactorily complete the exercise the student must ditch his equipment correctly on one dive and make a controlled ascent. He must then don his equipment correctly on one dive and make a controlled ascent. The students mask must be completely clear of water. When checked, the weight belt must have a right hand release, and no twists in any straps. The fins must be full on the feet with no twists in the straps.

Treading Water

  • Equipment – None.
  • Procedure – The exercise begins with the student moving from waist deep water into deep water. On the command “Hands up”, the student will raise their hands out of the water and tread water by using their legs only. Correct form is the key to the exercise. The student’s motion with the legs should be in an egg-beater fashion, with the legs coming together simultaneously or alternatively. The motion of the legs must also be both rhythmical and forceful to maintain positive buoyancy of the student. The student must ensure their hands above the wrist and their head do not break the water line for the minimum evaluated time.

Weight Belt Swim

  • Equipment – Mask, fins, wet-suit boots, and 16lb weight belt.
  • Procedure – The exercise begins when the student moves from waist deep water into the deep end of the pool. The student must swim on his side, either left or right, with the leading arm out in front, continuously for the designated period of time. While swimming, the student cannot switch from his left to right side or vice versa (the side you start on is it), swim on his back, or touch any portion of the pool (sides or bottom). The student can use his other arm to assist in a “recovery stroke” to help lift his head out of the water to breath.

 

ETCA REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS:

Viewable from a military network computer at: https://www.my.af.mil/etcacourses/showcourse.asp?as_course_id=L3AQR1T231%200P1B 

COURSE ID: L3AQR1T231 0P1B
TITLE: Pararescue Indoctrination Course

AFSC: 1T231

DATE UPDATED: 6/30/2017
START DATE: 01/19/2016
LOCATION: JBSA-Lackland AFB (Tech Trng)
OWNER CODE: 0JTT
LENGTH: 45 AETC Training Days
ORG/PGM: Air Education and Training Command / Technical Training
CLASS FREQ: 5 Classes per year
COURSE CONTACT:
BA TG Detachment 1 / DSN 473-4609

Course Description:
This indoctrination course provides personnel selected for the PJ and CRO career field rigorous
physical and mentally-stressful training in order to prepare them for the pipeline training courses and their final AFSC-awarding course. Information presented in the course includes the following: Basic Career Field Knowledge, Water Confidence Training, Physical Training, Psychological Enhancement Training, Exercise Physiology, Sports Nutrition, and Prerequisite Supplemental Pipeline Training.
Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland is the primary location for this training. Students in the 1T231 and 13D1 field are required to attend this Indoctrination course to continue training in the pipeline.

Admin Instructions:
POVs are not authorized for use (while at, to, or from) while attending the Indoctrination course. Members are required to report in uniform with full military complement. Retrainee personnel must have current Class III flying physical with AETC Surgeon General approval indicating that member is medically qualified to perform Airborne Parachutist, AF Combat Dive Course, and Military Freefall duties IAW Army Reg. 40-501 and Air Force Instruction 48-123 medical standards. ARC personnel must in- and out-process through the Lackland AFB ARC Liaison office before training. All follow-on pipeline prerequisite training for ARC, NPS, PS, officer, and retrainee students will be scheduled by 350 BA TS Pararescue/Combat Control Pipeline Schedulers, with instructions for orders publication sent to the appropriate units/MPFs.

NOTICE: Candidates are not permitted to bring personal firearms or ammunition while attending BA TG Courses. If firearms are transported to a BA TG courses due to TDY enroute, PCS, or some other unavoidable circumstance; they must be declared to BA training leadership immediately with prior coordination, and turned-in to the SFS armory immediately upon arrival. A copy of the AF Form 1314, Firearms Registration, and the DD Form 2760, Qualifications to Possess Firearms or Ammunition will be submitted to SFS Armory, and to BA training leadership. Failure to comply with the above instructions is punishable under Article 92; Failure to Comply; under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Equipment Required:
Mandatory Items: Uniforms with full Military compliment to include:
1 Full service dress blues with all supporting accoutrements
1 Pair running Shoes
1 Field/Gortex jacket
1 Pair of good gloves 2 Belts for ABU
2 pair of boots (one for field use and one for inspection)
4 Sets of ABU
5 ABU T-shirts (sand color)
10 Pair all white ankle Socks (no logos or print of any kind)
10 Pair of socks for ABU
Cold weather clothing/accoutrements as needed during winter months
Razor and shaving cream/toiletries
Recommended Items (Can be purchased at Lackland AFB)
1 Notebook
1 Roll OD Green Duct Tape
1 Box Ziploc Bags (1qt)
1 Basic Training style flashlight with extra D batteries
1 Pack of Light Bulbs and extra batteries for flashlight
1 32oz Gatorade bottle
2 Black Ball-Point Pens
2 Black Sharpie Pens (permanent)
2 Box Ziploc Bags (2.5gal)
Dry bags (for water proofing rucks)
Band-Aids

Prerequisites:
All trainee’s (NPS/GTEPs, Retrainees, ARC, AF prior service, and sister service prior service) must successfully complete the Physical Ability and Stamina Test (PAST). Member must be a US citizen, be able to obtain a Secret clearance, volunteer for hazardous duty (e.g., military combat diver (SCUBA), military parachuting), score a minimum of 43 on the general category of the ASVAB test (sister service equivalent), must pass flying Class III physical with eye restriction as prescribed for parachutist/marine diving duty. All physicals MUST be reviewed and stamped by HQ AETC/SGPS (US Army will only recognize the AETC/SG stamp). The PAST criteria must be administered and the trainee must pass the test prior to attending the Pararescue Indoctrination Course. For Non-Prior Service trainee’s, the test will administered during Basic Military Training (BMT), GTEPs will be tested prior to attending BMT and during BMT, Prior Service will be tested at the Recruiting Station.

Quota Control:
HQ AETC/A3PP

Security Requirements:
Submitted for Secret clearance by class start date.

Special Notes:
ATTENTION ALL MPFs/Unit TMs: PJ Indoctrination graduation dates are now aligned with Air
Force Combat Dive Course start dates meaning students will depart direct for Dive training from Lackland AFB TX. They will not return to home unit. You should be contacted by the PJ Pipeline Manager, Mr. James Kinsey at least two weeks in advance of the Indoctrination Course graduation to begin processing amendments/orders. All NPS, Prior service, retrainee’ s, Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve, and active duty Combat Rescue Officer’s will leave from Lackland AFB Texas direct to Panama City FL to attend the Air Force Combat Dive Course. Orders must be cut and forwarded to SSgt Reyes one duty day prior to class graduation.

Location Information:
JBSA-Lackland AFB (Tech Trng) USAF
1220 Truemper Street
Lackland AFB
San Antonio, TX 78236
37TRG.DOS@US.AF.MIL
POC: 37 TRG/DOS

AETC Information Requests
Contact the Training Manager (TM) for information on a specific course. This includes all inquiries regarding class start dates, location, reporting times, uniform requirements, etc. The TM course contact can be found at the top of the ETCA page listed next to the Weblink and Course Contact headings. Please do not call the location information POC.
Location information POC: DSN 473-8930

Communication concerning training issues can be made at the Customer Service information Line (CSIL), DSN 473-2917, or e-mail 37TRG.DOS@US.AF.MIL.

Note
Course announcements have precedence over these instructions. Follow any specific
guidance provided in the course announcements. Location information is for 37 TRG Tech
Training TDY students only and does not apply to BMT, Medical, Dental or other Services
training.

Lackland Motorcycle Safety Requirements
Personnel TDY to Lackland who will be operating a motorcycle must be properly licensed
and have completed motorcycle safety training (A Motorcycle Safety Foundation Course)
IAW AFI 91-207, The US Air Force Traffic Safety Program. Failure to provide proof
of these items will result in personnel not being able to operate their motorcycles.

Student Quarters
Government quarters are also available for civilian students. On-base lodging reservations can be made by calling 210-671-4277/0047/2566/3622 or DSN 473-4277/0047/2566/3622. Reservations may also be made on-line at www.dodlodging.net. If government quarters are not used, adequate commercial facilities are located immediately outside the base and are served by city bus transportation. Vicinity travel reimbursements are not authorized.

Air Force Fitness Program
Unit commanders ensure military personnel selected for training comply with AFI 36-2905, Fitness Program.

Seasonal Uniform Changes
Long underwear and field jacket liners are recommended for students attending courses taught at Camp Bullis and Lackland Training Annex (LTA) during the period of October through April. Full finger gloves are recommended for all courses located at Camp Bullis.

TDY Tech Trng Students Billeted at Kelly Inn

Individuals attending TDY to School (TTS) Tech training are sporadically billeted at the JBSA-Lackland Kelly Annex. A rental vehicle may be authorized to ensure these students are afforded transportation to/from training, dining facilities and for any other “official transportation FOUO.” IAW AFI36-2616, paragraph 7.6, requests for rental cars must be approved in advance of course start date. To request a compact rental vehicle, members are required to contact 2 AF/MRTP at DSN 597-7005/4/3 or e-mail 2AF.MRTP.US.AF.MIL.

Student Assistance
Personnel arriving at San Antonio International Airport should contact the Military Reception Desk in the airport terminal building for information about transportation to Lackland AFB.

Physical Conditioning
All students must comply, at a minimum, with AFI 36-2905, Fitness Program. AdditionalPT requirements listed in custom paragraphs will take precedence.

Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center (WHASC)
Officer and civilian students are assigned to WHASC; enlisted are assigned to the Medical Services
Squadron Section, WHASC.

REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS
The following reporting instructions apply to courses taught on JBSA-Lackland AFB. Reporting
instructions for JBSA-Lackland 37th Training Wing courses conducted at other training sites are
contained in those training sites’ special instructions or in the individual course announcements.
Enlisted and GS-6 or below students in TDY status, with the exception of 350 BA TRG students, report
to Base Lodging, VAQ Gateway Inn, Bldg 10203, 1 day before class start date. Officers and GS-7 or
above students in TDY status, with the exception of 350 BA TRG students, report to VOQ, Bldg 2604.
Lodging is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Guard and Reserve students attending Security Forces
courses should draw per diem prior to arrival or arrive 24 hrs prior to class start to draw per diem
locally. Unit of assignment will be based on type of training.
350th Battlefield Airman (BA) Training Group: PJ, CCT, TACP and CBAT courses.
37th Training Group:
341 Training Squadron Courses: Military working dog training.
343 Training Squadron Courses: Security Forces Apprentice Training, Basic SF Officer Training, all
advanced Security Forces Training, and Combat Arms Training.
344 Training Squadron Courses: Safety, Aircrew Fundamentals Course (AFC), Center of Excellence
(CoE) for Career Enlisted Aviators (CEAs), TEMPEST, Materiel Management, Contracting, Logistics
Plans, Recruiting, and Fleet Management & Analysis. Vehicle Maintenance courses are located at Det 1,
Port Hueneme, CA.
345 Training Squadron Courses: Air Transportation, Services, HAZMAT, CMOS, TMO conducted at Fort
Lee, VA.
37 TRSS: Faculty development courses.

Air National Guard (ANG) students who are returning as a Break In Training (BIT) from BMT are
required to report to the training squadron (TRS) military training flight (MTF), a week prior to CSD.
NPS pipeline students in TDY status report to the military training flight (MTF).
Technical school eliminee (TSE) students report to military training flight of assignment NLT 2 duty
days before class start date. One set of student travel orders will be sent to the Registrar’s Branch.
TSEs have class entry priority.