Maximize Performance; Q&A with Team ST Coach Shawn

Sanderson Performance’s Coach Shawn; founder of Team ST, sits down with Specialtactics.com to talk workouts and maximizing performance. 1)    What were your primary goals when developing Team ST? When developing Team ST I first looked at what the requirements to graduate selection are and why so many applicants were unable to make it. I then compared that against my own experience and what I thought were the limiting factors that made selection more difficult. In the end it came to one of two things: 1- Mindset, most guys that didn’t make it decided, at some point, that this job wasn’t for them and they quit. The fact of the matter is, they were right, and there is nothing I can do or say to anyone that will change their perspective when they are confronted with that level of stress, other than take it in a little at a time and eventually you’ll be done. 2- Injury, those that did not quit, either washed out due to an acute injury, or developed a sustained injury from overtraining that lead to a failure to train (FTT). This is typically not due to a lack of fitness. Everyone that made it to this point successfully completed the PAST, some of them actually already met or exceeded grad standards before they even started. How is this possible? They trained to the test, in a low threat environment, and never built the foundation to survive the 10 weeks leading up to the test. Skipping crucial elements leads to failure. This is what drove my primary goals, which are: –  Attack limiting factors that cause trainees to fail –  Build a foundation in athleticism that will translate to efficient movement, both biomechanically and neurologically – Build resiliency and reduce risk of injury from the volume achieved during selection – Provide a “team like” setting for candidates to start holding each other and themselves accountable, because NO ONE graduates on their own.   2) The market is flooded with free and premiere workout programs.  How is Team ST programming unique and why have athletes chosen Team ST over the competition? At the end of the day, you get what you pay for; there are some decent free programs and some great premier programs. However, what I have found is that the majority of “pre-selection” programs are limited to a 6-12 week canned training plan and are composed of high volume work similar to what the candidate will see at selection. This sounds like it makes perfect sense; however, the issue arises when the athlete hits a plateau or sustains an overtraining injury and falls behind in their fitness levels. Even worse, if this is the only training they do prior to showing up at selection, they typically already have an ailment that is bothering them or they are to a point where 10 more weeks of high volume training will break them, literally. Additionally, there typically isn’t any kind of team atmosphere with these unless guys have a local network and they are able to run the same programs together. Team ST solves these problems by providing programming specifically designed to build a foundation that will aid them in withstanding the rigors of selection.  Additionally, the programming is constantly changing in order to prevent plateaus or regressions in performance. Finally, Team ST is truly a worldwide “team.” We have members from all over the world who are sharing their performance on the team leaderboard, discussing nutrition protocols and recovery techniques, and asking whatever questions they can think of regarding the team or training concepts. All of this is happening within the training app. The feedback that I have received so far, is that guys are feeling stronger, healthier and are having less complaints of chronic pain than when they were following other programs.   3) Who is Team ST designed for?  Is Team ST tailored for the athlete preparing for the PAST or for the athlete attempting to meet selection grad standards? Team ST is designed far anyone who wants to maximize there performance and increase there chances of surviving selection. We typically conduct the PAST  (or the operators PT test for phase 2 candidates) through the various training cycles. We won’t test the grad standards here as they aren’t applicable to building the athletes capabilities. If you have a strong foundation, you will keep up with the progression just fine throughout selection. Because of this, I can say with confidence, that an athlete who conducts consistent training with Team ST for at least 20-24 weeks will have a significant advantage physiologically than someone who simply builds up to a 6 mile run, 4K meter swim and high rep body weight calisthenics. As I stated earlier, I have seen guys enter with grad standard numbers and not graduate[…]

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STO Selection–10 burning questions

Specialtactics.com sat down with a recent graduate of the Special Tactics Officer (STO) Phase I and II selection course.  We had 10 burning questions for him regarding his preparation and keys to success:   1) You recently successfully completed STO Phase I & II selection. For those that may not know, what are these two phases of the STO selection process and what are they designed to do? Referencing the 24 SOW web page and current STO application: STO Application FY 2019 Phase I is the initial application submission, designed to assess the likelihood of success of each candidate based on the information provided. A review board consisting of STO’s ranks and identifies candidates selected to be invited to Phase II. “Phase II Selection is conducted at Hurlburt Field, FL. The purpose of Phase II is to assess each candidate in the ST attributes for the purpose of determining if you have the raw skills to operate in the Special Operations environment.” 2) What made you want to pursue STO selection? I was a CCT for 9 years prior, nothing I’ve seen has compared to the heritage and brotherhood that comes along with the battlefield airmen careers that I’ve been a part of. I wanted an opportunity to lead battlefield airmen, provide top cover to make their lives easier, and do everything I can to make sure everyone crushes the mission and makes it home. All the fun parts of the job that come along with it are a bonus. 3) How did you design your physical training regimen for a selection course that can be so multi-faceted and unpredictable? Phase II is a week long, so it centered around long training iterations focusing on functional fitness, cals/running/rucking combinations, and getting in the pool for all the water confidence training. I would not recommend focusing on training for your 1 rep max and calling it a day. If you are looking for a structured program, there are numerous programs out there designed for assessment training for all branches of service. 4) Often time, guys refer to battlefield airmen selection course preparation as 90% mental and 10% physical. What is meant by this and do you agree with it? I agree, you can be the strongest person to ever go through the courses, but you will still be pushed to your limits, and if you can’t handle the stress or adversity, you will not make it. At some point, every individual will be pushed to a breaking point, where quitting will seem like the more desirable option than the pain currently being endured. If you have a good mental foundation, like a challenge, and possess a tough, never-quit attitude, you will do extremely well because you will progress accordingly. The courses are really designed to build you up over the length of the pipelines of each career field. You can see this in the PT tests’ requirements becoming more demanding as one progresses through the respective pipelines. 5) What were some of the physical and mental highlights of your Phase II selection? Don’t have particular examples, but you will be amazed at some of things you can do when you think you are already pushed to your limits if you have the right mindset. 6) Did you find any portion of the assessment difficult or over-challenging in which you weren’t prepared for? If so, how did you overcome it? The whole week is taxing from a physical and mental standpoint, just remember why you are doing it. Biggest thing I notice are issues for candidates are failure of initial PT test on poor calisthenic form and pool sessions. Reference STO application for all expectations. From STO application: “Candidates must be prepared for a physically and mentally demanding week. You cannot trust your judgment of your physical and mental preparedness prior to coming to Phase II. Feedback from most candidates indicates that this week is more demanding than anything they anticipated. The cadre will push you physically and mentally beyond your comfort zone to assess those critical attributes in adverse situations. You will be expected to perform to the best of your ability in all events.” 7) Approximately how many candidates were in your Phase II selection and how many were actually selected? Approximately 28 in selection, around 17 made it through the week, 8 selected. 8) What do you believe were some of the key factors or attributes that the Phase II cadre were looking for in candidates that many came to the course not possessing? My opinion in no particular order: confidence, decisiveness, maturity, selflessness, adaptability. 9) For someone interested in becoming a STO, what would be 3 to 5 key pieces of advice you would give someone desiring to pursue this profession to prepare for selection? Know why you[…]

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ST Performance Preview

Team ST GOES LIVE ON 25 March! So you want to join the ranks of Air Force Special Tactics? I don’t blame you; it’s an amazing experience! However, it will take a ton of hard work and dedication to get you there. One of the major requirements, as you should know by now, is an extreme level of physical preparation. Learn what ST Performance is about from coach Shawn- a Specialtactics operator and Power Athlete Block I coach. Do you have questions or comments?  Find Coach Shawn in the newly structured Specialtactics Team ST subforum or go to the Specialtactics.com Facebook page

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Training to Strengths & Weaknesses

The Problem A common mistake guys consistently make when training for selection is how and where they focus their energy while training. Too often, candidates are spending time in the exact opposite manner as they should be to prepare for what could be considered the biggest hurdle of their entire life.   Battlefield Airmen selection courses are built around a set of standards that must be met prior to graduation. Simple concept, right?  But the point I want to make is that in order to graduate, you must meet ALL of the standards. Selection courses and the instructors assigned to them don’t care if you can run a 5’30 mile, knock out 30 pullups and swim like Michael Phelps if you can only do 30 push-ups. Likewise, if you can do [spp-timestamp time="1:15"] interval underwaters and perform 50m underwaters all day but can’t tread water for 2 minutes, you’re a failure in the same capacity as the guy that sucks at everything. The above shouldn’t come to anyone’s surprise- it’s a simple concept to grasp: you must pass all the standards in order to graduate. But there is an inherent tendency to not apply this concept when we are training. As humans, we naturally gravitate to events we are strong in and reluctantly avoid items we are poor at. Think about it- we do this in the academic classes we sign up for in school, the sports we choose to play and how we workout while at the gym.  We naturally enjoy doing things we are good at and do them more often than things we are poor at.  By doing this, we become better at the things we were already good at and remain lousy at the items we sucked at to begin with. The Solution This tendency ultimately sets us up for failure when training for selection. By avoiding your weak points, you are failing to neutrale your greatest threat for course failure. To combat this phenomenon, you need to be cognizant of this trap and FOCUS ON IMPROVING YOUR WEAKNESSES WHILE MAINTAINING YOUR STRENGTHS.  Come to grips with the fact that you suck at some things. But embrace the challenge of turning your weaknesses into a strength. The benchmark for determining your strengths and weaknesses can be as simple as utilizing the graduation standards of your selection course as a guideline, such as Indoc.  The PAST is not a good standard to use as it is considered a baseline requirement to enter selection.  If you train to solely pass the PAST, you will not be successful.  Train past the PAST. Identify your weak points and make it a personal challenge to be better at your poor events.  It is often said a special operator is a Jack of All Trades, Master of None.  Embrace that mantra.  There is no need to be great at one thing, but you do need to be good at everything. Now go kick some ass.  

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Workout intensity

Pay Now or Pay Later? Tune-Up Your Training

During a recent road trip work, I found myself riding shotgun talking to my Air Force boss about life, work and family.  My boss was an older gentleman, an O-6 Colonel in the Air Force.  He was nearing retirement and had accomplished so much during his career.  He was well respected amongst his peers, a prior group commander and an accomplished medical doctor.  And although once upon a time, he was a college kid without a clue, he dedicated his earlier years of life to putting his head down and grinding out the hard things early on so that he would be setup for the rest of his life.  And indeed he was. Alternatively, my boss spoke of his kids- who were all good people.  They pursued careers out of high school, such as law enforcement, military service (enlisted) and such and made decent livings.  But his kids struggled to become successful like their father had.  Although my boss attempted to instill the ‘work hard early’ life lessons in his children, they chose a different path and struggled into adult-hood.  They sometimes scraped by month to month to make ends meat while they worked their middle/low income jobs in high income areas.  As they attempt now to re-define their career paths, they are putting in the hard hours like their father did but ultimately will never amount to the stability their dad has because they have already fallen too far behind the power curve.  And as I listened to my boss speak of his kids, I felt a sense of sadness in his voice as I sensed he would have liked to have seen his kids turn out more like he did. The point that my boss was trying to make to me was the principle, and timing of work ethic.  While it is important to be a hard worker, the timing of your hard work may be even more critical.  The opportunity to get ahead in life should be taken as soon as possible- to get a jump on the power curve of success.  The blood, sweat and tears should be sacrificed earlier rather than later, because the road blocks that will inevitably arise in life will most likely prohibit you from ever catching up. The same principles are critical to your training mindset.  As you are grinding away in the gym/in the pool/on the track towards your Battlefield Airmen dreams, your efforts now will set the tone for how your selection course will play out.  There are moments in training where you will be drained, tired and unmotivated- it happens.  But what should keep you driven is the thought that you can put in the work now or you can pay for it at selection.  If you are successful at putting the work in early, you will literally thank yourself at selection for putting in the maximum amount of work before hand.  Conversely you will kick yourself if you arrive at selection unprepared- because you know the pain you are about to experience is much more because of your lack of action during training. Think about it: Would you rather puke during your workouts now on your terms or at the selection course with an instructor in your face as you are trying to prove you have what it takes?  This should be an easy answer.   Lance Armstrong once said, “I’m not happy if I’m not doing some physical suffering, like going out on a bike ride or running. First, it’s good for you. No. 2, it sort of clears my mind on a daily basis. And it’s a job. My job is to suffer. I make the suffering in training hard so that the races are not full of suffering.”  Armstrong was a guy that would ride grueling, debilitating mountain climbs once a month when his competitors would ride them once a year.  Because he was a beast due to his preparation, he was one of the most prolific cyclists ever.  Channel your inner Lance Armstrong and suffer now (except don’t do drugs, don’t be a dick and don’t lose a testicle). Putting the same mindset to work is your key to success.  Pay now or pay later; its your choice.  I suggest the former.

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The Battlefield Airman Library

My recommended list of books, focused on Battlefield Airmen lives, careers and missions.  “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.” Find this list and more recommended items on the Specialtactics.com Resources Page. Guardian Angel Guardian Angel provides a rare glimpse at a PJ’s mind-blowing adventures. You follow Sgt. Sine’s trek across exotic lands and share his encounters with mysterious cultures. Learn what it takes to lower from a helicopter onto the slippery decks of storm-tossed ships to rescue dying sailors. Feel what it’s like to be caught in the middle of a bomb blast so powerful that it tears high-rise buildings in half, and flattens armored vehicles hundreds of yards away. Soar high above towering jungle trees and experience the danger of swinging on a slim cable below a helicopter while performing a mid-air rescue of a pilot, dangling from his chute a hundred feet above a mountain slope. Go to war in Afghanistan and parachute onto a nocturnal battlefield surrounded by land mines to help a mortally wounded soldier. This is a deadly serious business: when things go wrong, they can go terribly wrong. Aircraft crash into mountainsides, killing all onboard, while some PJs live through horrendous helicopter crashes only to struggle with freezing temperatures, snapped limbs and torn flesh in a desperate fight for survival. This book presents true stories of uncommon courage told from the perspective of the actual men in the arena.   None Braver From award-winning journalist and combat veteran Michael Hirsh comes the thrilling inside story of the Air Force’s pararescue operations in Afghanistan. The first journalist to be embedded with an Air Force combat unit in the War on Terrorism, Hirsh flew from Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, with the 71st Rescue Squadron to their expeditionary headquarters at a secret location in Central Asia. Unparalleled access to the PJs, as well as to the courageous men and women who fly them where they have to go, often under enemy fire, allowed Hirsh to uncover incredible stories of courage.   My Brother in Arms; The Exceptional Life of Mark Andrew Forester, USAF CCT On September 29, 2010 Mark Forester was killed in action while fighting terrorists in Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan. His heroic legacy of being shot down while preparing to rescue a fallen teammate began long before this tragic day. An Apache aviator said of Mark’s final battle: …”I have never witnessed such an act of heroism in my three years of fighting in combat. I have over 2,700 hours total time with 1,500 hours of combat time in both Iraq and Afghanistan…JAG 28 continued to advance on the enemy while taking intense enemy fire, and continuously fired his weapon in an attempt to get to his fallen teammate and destroy the enemy.”… Since Mark’s death, his family’s eyes and hearts have been opened to multiple examples of selflessness and patriotism by meeting his teammates and leaders in the military. The family has witnessed first-hand the ability for them to turn off their stern, professional personae and turn on compassion, love, support and acceptance. The author feels a strong desire to Honor our Heroes. This book highlights one hero, SrA Mark A. Forester, and also helps recognize many other men and women who volunteer to fight for our freedom.   Never Quit Never Quit is the true story of how Jimmy Settle, an Alaskan shoe store clerk, became a Special Forces Operator and war hero. After being shot in the head during a dangerous high mountain operation in the rugged Watapur Valley in Afghanistan, Jimmy returns to battle with his teammates for a heroic rescue, the bullet fragments stitched over and still in his skull. In a cross between a suicide rescue mission and an against-all-odds mountain battle, his team of PJs risk their lives again in an epic firefight. When his helicopter is hit and begins leaking fuel, Jimmy finds himself in the worst possible position as a rescue specialist―forced to leave members from his own team behind. Jimmy will have to risk everything to get back into the battle and bring back his brothers.   Pararescue: The True Story of an Incredible Rescue at Sea and the Heroes Who Pulled It Off This is the gripping and unforgettable true adventure of an astonishing rescue at sea — a tale of the unparalleled courage and skill of men who endured a record-breaking fifteen-hour, nonstop helicopter ride through bone-jarring turbulence to carry out a mission on the ragged edge of impossibility. It is the story of a unit of the New York Air National Guard, the 106th Rescue Wing, which includes the famed PJs, the Pararescuemen, whose training is so rigorous and standards so high that only a dedicated handful qualify to join;[…]

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cone fit

43 Weeks of Battlefield Airman Workout Plans

Here are 43 FREE, FOCUSED, COMPLETE & COMPREHENSIVE weekly workout plans to integrate into your preparation regimen for Battlefield Airmen selection training.  These ‘Dirty Scurve’ workouts are brought to you by the fine folks of Cone Fit.  Although the continual refreshment of workouts has ceased, their legacy now lives on here at Specialtactics.com. A prior sneak-peak of 12 workouts was published earlier this month.  The list below is the complete, unadulterated list of workouts that were published from the Cone Fit crew from start to finish.  I would recommend you adjust the numbers to your physical abilities as many of these workouts are designed to be challenging. These workouts were made for cones, by cones.  If you are looking for a professional training program for little cost that will keep you healthy, strong and leave you ultimately the best prepared, check out Team ST All 43 Workouts (.zip): CLICK HERE Individual Workouts (.pdf): #1 The Dirty Scurve Mar 28 – Apr 2 #2 The Dirty Scurve Apr 4 – 9 #3 The Dirty Scurve Apr 11 – 15 #4 The Dirty Scurve Apr 18-22 #5 The Dirty Scurve Apr 25- 30 #6 The Dirty Scurve May 2 – May 7 #7 The Dirty Scurve May 9 – May 14 #8 The Dirty Scurve May 16 – 21 #9 The Dirty Scurve May 23 – 27 #10 The Dirty Scurve May 30 – June 3 #11 The Dirty Scurve June 6-10 #12 The Dirty Scurve June 13-17 #13 The Dirty Scurve June 20-24 #14 The Dirty Scurve June 27-July1 #15 The Dirty Scurve July 4-8 #16 The Dirty Scurve July 11-16 #17 The Dirty Scurve July 18 – 23 #18 The Dirty Scurve July 25 – 30 #19 The Dirty Scurve August 1 – 6 #20 The Dirty Scurve (August 8 – 13) #21 The Dirty Scurve (August 15 – 20) #22 The Dirty Scurve (August 22 – 27) #23 The Dirty Scurve (Aug 29 – Sept 3) #24 The Dirty Scurve (Sep 5 – 10) #25 The Dirty Scurve (Sep 12 – 17) #26 The Dirty Scurve (Sep 19 – 24) #27 The Dirty Scurve (Sept 26 – Oct 1) #28 The Dirty Scurve (Oct 3 – 8) #29 The Dirty Scurve (Oct 10 – 15) #30 The Dirty Scurve (Oct 17 – 22) #31 The Dirty Scurve (Oct 24 – 29) #32 The Dirty Scurve (Oct 31 – 6) #33 1-17 The Dirty Scurve (Feb 4 – 11) #34 2-17 The Dirty Scurve (Mar 13 – 18) #35 3-17 The Dirty Scurve (Mar 20 – 25) #36 4-17 The Dirty Scurve (March 27- April 1) #37 5-17 The Dirty Scurve (April 3 – 8) #38 6-17 The Dirty Scurve (April 10-15) #39 7-17 The Dirty Scurve (April 17-22) #40 8-17 The Dirty Scurve 2017 (April 24-29) #41 9-17 The Dirty Scurve (May 8-13) #42 10-17 The Dirty Scurve (May 15 – 20) #43 11-17 The Dirty Scurve July 17-22

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4 breath hold exercises to boost your underwater time

Just like hitting the gym is a cornerstone to improving your muscular capacity, the same can be applied to underwater confidence.  Training your body to endure the rigors of oxygen deprivation and Co2 tolerance is just as important as other forms of training while prepping for selection.  And just like utilizing different exercises to train the same muscle groups, there is more than one way to train for underwater exercises.  We don’t need to limit ourselves to doing endless 25m underwaters to improve our capacity– in fact I would disapprove of this method. There are two physiological factors at play when attempting to increase your breath hold capability: O2 deprivation and Co2 tolerance.  Your urgency to pop during underwater activities is largely attributed to the buildup of Co2 in your body- not the lack of oxygen (although lack of O2 is still a factor- just not the primary one).  That’s why I suggest you apply more focus to the Co2 tolerance tables below rather than the O2. -Static Tables are breathing exercises meant to be done while sitting still; in a rest position.  What’s great about these is you can do them almost anywhere.  (DO NOT ATTEMPT THESE TABLES WHILE DRIVING!) -Dynamic Tables are while you are in motion.  This could be while doing underwaters, walking, sprinting or performing any other motion that depletes your breath hold capacity quicker than while at rest. The tables below can be modified!  Adjust the times up or down to meet your performance level.  You can also mix it up by attempting 100m breath hold sprints on a track, etc.  The purpose is to have fun with these while increasing your breath hold capacity. These should be challenging, so push yourself and you will get better overnight.  Do not expect overnight results.  This, along with any other exercise program, takes time to see results. Static Co2 Tolerance Table (3-4x per week): Above water, not moving breath holds (ie: sitting in a chair or lying down) Breathe           Hold [spp-timestamp time="2:30"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] [spp-timestamp time="2:15"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] [spp-timestamp time="1:45"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] [spp-timestamp time="1:30"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] [spp-timestamp time="1:15"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] [spp-timestamp time="1:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] [spp-timestamp time="1:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] [spp-timestamp time="1:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"]   Static O2 Deprivation Table (1-2x per week): Above water, not moving breath holds (ie: sitting in a chair or lying down) Breathe           Hold [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  :40 [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  :50 [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:10"] [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:20"] [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:30"] [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:40"] [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="1:50"] [spp-timestamp time="2:00"]                  [spp-timestamp time="2:00"] Dynamic Co2 Deprivation Table: -Perform 25m underwater with no fins and rest on the opposite side (do not freestyle back to the starting point).  This  table can also be accomplished on land by walking 30 seconds instead of the underwater. 25m underwater      [spp-timestamp time="1:30"] rest 25m underwater      [spp-timestamp time="1:20"] rest 25m underwater      [spp-timestamp time="1:10"] rest 25m underwater      [spp-timestamp time="1:00"] rest 25m underwater        :50 rest 25m underwater        :40 rest 25m underwater        :30 rest 25m underwater Static Single Breath Hold Repetitions: This Co2 tolerance exercise is a substitute for the co2 table above if you are short on time. -Take one exhalation/inhalation every :45 seconds for [spp-timestamp time="6:00"]. (Example: Inhale and breath hold, start the clock.  At :45 exhale your breath, take one inhale and continue to hold.  Repeat at [spp-timestamp time="1:30"], [spp-timestamp time="2:15"], [spp-timestamp time="2:30"], etc)

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cone fit

12 ‘Dirty Scurve’ Workouts courtesy of Cone Fit

The gents at Cone Fit did a phenomenal job creating workouts for “Cones” interested in trying out at a Battlefield Selection course.  The PDFs below have been preserved and compiled for your viewing and training pleasure. There’s multiple aspects of these workouts that I really enjoy, including: -A tribute to a “Badass of the Week” operator who did amazing things -A motivational quote to get your juices flowing before you go rip your body apart -A comprehensive workout for all stages of selection, including calisthenics, weight training, cardio, rucking, grass and gorilla drills, swimming and water confidence. 20170204 The Dirty Scurve (Feb 4 – 11) 20170213 The Dirty Scurve (Feb 13 – 18) 20170227 The Dirty Scurve 2017 Feb 27-4 20170306 The Dirty Scurve 2017 Mar 6-11 20170313 The Dirty Scurve 2017 Mar 13-18 20170320 The Dirty Scurve 2017 Mar 20-25 20170327 The Dirty Scurve 2017 March 27- April 1 20170403 The Dirty Scurve 2017 April 3-8 20170410 The Dirty Scurve 2017 April 10-15 20170424 The Dirty Scurve 2017 April 24-29 20170508 The Dirty Scurve 2017 May 8-13 20170717 The Dirty Scurve July 17-22    

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How to DOUBLE your breath hold in 15 minutes

I’ve tried this myself and validated this technique with the core group of guys I work with at the pool. I’ve seen guys’ breath hold go from an initial :45-[spp-timestamp time="1:15"] to [spp-timestamp time="2:40"]-[spp-timestamp time="3:28"] utilizing the below technique. First, some key information: -Deep Breathing: “Deep breathing” involves taking a big breath in through the mouth, holding for one second, and then exhaling for 10 seconds through your mouth through your almost-closed mouth with tongue pressed against your lower teeth. It should be a hissing exhalation and make a “tsssssss…” sound. All breathing and exercises are performed though the mouth. -Purging: “Purging” involves a strong exhalation as if you were trying to blow a toy sailboat across a pool, followed by a big but faster inhalation. Cheeks puffed out as you do the exhalation (imagine the big bad wolf blowing the pigs’ homes down). Be careful not to heave or rock back and forth, which wastes oxygen. Keep as still as possible. -Success Tips: 1) Find a comfortable chair free of distractions. 2) Do not move around while performing this test to keep your heart rate as low as possible.  This includes moving your hands & arms or shrugging your shoulders when inhaling.  Any movement, no matter how small, increases heart rate. 3) Make a conscious effort on your breath hold to inhale and fill your lungs fully.  Concentrate on slowly filling your stomach, then your lower chest, then upper chest, then your trachea and then your throat and mouth.  Maximize the airspace available to you. 4) Distract yourself while holding your breath.  Recount your favorite movie in your head or associate each letter of the alphabet with a name of someone you know. ALRIGHT, NOW FOR THE TEST. DISCLAIMER: THIS IS FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. DO NOT ATTEMPT IN WATER! Sitting still, do a baseline breath hold and record your time. Then perform: [spp-timestamp time="1:30"] deep breathing, then [spp-timestamp time="1:15"] purging (if you feel like you’re going to pass out, do it less intensely) Hold breath for target [spp-timestamp time="1:30"], no more After your [spp-timestamp time="1:30"] breath hold: Take 3 large recovery breaths, [spp-timestamp time="1:30"] deep breathing, [spp-timestamp time="1:30"] purging, Hold breath for target [spp-timestamp time="2:30"], no more After your [spp-timestamp time="2:30"] breath hold: Take 3 large recovery breaths, [spp-timestamp time="2:00"] deep breathing, [spp-timestamp time="1:45"] purging, Hold breath for as long as possible & record your initial and final times in the comments box.  (FYI, Harry Houdini’s life-time record is [spp-timestamp time="3:30"]).

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